Popular Website Wireframes for Content Strategy Success

Starting with Wireframes—Guarantee Web Design and Content Strategy Success

The purpose of these wireframe web design samples is to aid the client-designer relationship. Wireframing can save time and help new ideas come to light. Starting right is often the key to web design success. Seeing a number of different approaches at once helps clients consider their content and how it will relate to design more effectively. These design samples are intended to help designers help their clients to quickly jumpstart the web design process.

These designs and descriptions are easy to follow for marketing professionals and designers alike. The samples selected reflect recent trends in responsive web design. Only desktop views are shown in this post, but all the designs are meant to lend themselves easily to responsive web design. This post is really the second part of the “7 Top Website Content To Tips Guarantee Engagement” blog post, which focuses mainly on writing. Here we focus on design.

1. The Apple

A minimalist web approach with space used to maximum advantage. Also note the overall height of the layout is short compared to most designs today. The simple formula: nav > hero image with opening statement > row of product, benefit, or service tiles > quick statement or call to action > a fat footer with numerous internal links > final copyright, social media line.

2. The Lear

This powerful website design “front-loads” the home page with content and branding opportunities, yielding a rich experience for the viewer—almost like a full custom brochure unfolding before your eyes. The website contains many strata. The formula: nav > hero image with opening statement and paragraph > row of product, benefit, or service tiles > rows of highlighted products or services > full page map > fat footer with numerous internal links > final copyright, social media line.

3. The Full Monte

The basic premise of this website design is that it is nearly a complete web ecosystem on the home landing page. The web design includes features, benefits, compelling graphics, map, brand statements, and a contact form in the fat footer.  The website contains many strata. The formula: nav > hero image with opening statement and paragraph > row of product, benefit, or service tiles > rows of highlighted products or services > branding statement over image stripe > full page map > fat footer with numerous internal links and contact form and prominent social media > final copyright line.Wireframe

4. Insets and Icons

This website is a variation on the previous designs with several key differences—insets and icons. The hero image now has three inset tiles to take the visitor to key core areas of the interior design. The advantage here is that you get a hero image, short brand statement and core areas all in the initial screen view. The potential downside is that the main screen area is so complete that it may discourage scrolling down to the remainder of the home page, which features icon-driven content and links. The formula: nav > hero image with branded statement and insets > row of product, benefit, or service tiles > row(s) of icon-driven content > brand statements > fat footer with numerous internal links and contact form and prominent social media > final copyright line.Wireframe

5. Slideshow

This website design is favored when trying to motivate visitors through visuals and lends itself well when brand is highly visual. The hero image is now a slide show of hero images. Most brand statements are set over darkened images and rather than tiles discussing services or features, the tiles simply display an appealing visual or product with short calls to action to learn more or see more. The formula: nav > hero slideshow images > brand statement over an image > various rows of products on display with limited texts > fat footer with numerous internal links and contact form or sign-up form with prominent social media > final copyright line.

6. Parallax

Parallax website layouts involve scrolling, traditionally scrolling down. As the visitor scrolls, an image below will come up and overlap the previous view. Parallax is often used with one-page websites and is generally best used when one wants to tell a visual story. The story is revealed to the web visitor as they scroll down. Internal linking is either non-existent or at a bare minimum, because you don’t want to impede the visitor’s scrolling activity. Most brand statements are set over graphical background. One wants to keep each full screen view in mind when designing. The formula: nav > hero images > brand statement over an image > various full screen strata of text or graphics > modest footer with prominent social media > final copyright line.Parallax Wireframe

7. Spare Me The Drama

This website design is practical and less image-driven.  The hero image now shares home screen real estate with a strong branding statement and encourages immediate internal linking. It sets up a design with more narrow strata. The page includes features, benefits, compelling graphics, brand statements, and a final brand statement in the fat footer. The website contains many strata. The formula: nav > short hero image with branding statement > rows of product, benefit, or service tiles > rows of highlighted products or services > branding statement over image stripe > fat footer with numerous internal links and contact link and prominent social media > final copyright line.Simple Wireframe

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